DoD requirements of metrics and measures techniques for condition and performance-based route service agreements must be balanced to avoid overwhelming dispatchers with massive amounts of supply line information to sift through to find the key drivers of route service quality, choosing between the vital few metrics and measures and the trivial many. It is anticipated that DoD should set an upper limit of metrics and measures to establish and track work order generation toward developing efficient spatial equipment deployment modes in order to avoid the results of unfocused, misdirected activities in which individual installations each try to optimise a different subset of measures, with no two installations having the same set of priorities is directing contract procurement quotes interface.

Timely reporting of condition and performance-based route service agreement metrics can allow DoD to better understand and apply the benefits that result from actions designed to improve route service and also allows installations to quickly identify and react to problem areas, such as in the area of spatial equipment deployment. Dispatchers responsible for performance reporting have noted that executive types live & breathe by standard reports, and that if for some reason a report is late, they never tire to inquire about it.

Once dispatchers have implemented condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programmes, the next steps consist of monitoring and reporting progress determination for regularly scheduled contract procurement quotes. It should be noted that many dispatch work order do not have a formal process in place to review and update their route condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programmes. DoD appears to subscribe to the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” philosophy. This approach is fine as long as DoD is capable of recognising when their condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programmes are outdated and due for review.

The guidebook highlights two main areas of greatest concern to dispatchers in meeting the changing requirements of surge contingency scenarios: Key techniques and recommendations for DoD to employ in the build, use and implementation of a route condition-based performance measurement system include:


TOP 10: “Obstacles with installation programme”  

1) Political infighting that resulted in supposed “ownership” of work order, and the reluctance to share it over the contract procurement quote network at the required frequency,
2) not all installations received the same reports at the same time under previous programmes. Automating some aspects of collection and work order generation means more timely and operationally relevant reports. 
3) Route service monitoring,  Evaluation of fiscal constraints,
4) Internal dispatch communications, Route service metrics and measures availability
5) Development of route service design standards, and  work order Risk functions,
6) Communication of objective goals and future achievements required for meeting work order requirements meet equipment deployment challenges.  
7) Convenience of route service when installation communications over the contract procurement quote system are consistently available.
8) Spatial and capacity availability—at what installation is the route service agreement provided, and can the different types and sizes of fleet components gain access to it?
9) Temporal availability--when and at what cost is the route service agreement provided? 
10) Information availability--does the installation know how to utilise the route service agreement for different types and sizes of fleet components?  


If a route service agreement is available for a given equipment deployment trip, an installation may choose rapid transit via the contract procurement system for a surge contingency scenario if convenient dispatch of work order are competitive with available modes of deploy types and sizes of fleet components. Requirements fully or partially under the control of the centralised dispatch operation that affect this decision are: 1)  Route Service delivery-- How well-designed are work order for deploying equipment for the route service agreements delivering the route service it provides on a day-to-day basis, and how adequate is it in meeting the expectations of installations? Factors include the reliability of route service agreements, the quality of installation contacts with busy dispatchers, and the achievement of promised route service goals and objectives. 2) Transit time and frequency-How long does it take to make the equipment deployment trip, particularly in comparison to other work order modes?


Certain aspects of dispatch maintenance programmes affect condition-based metrics and measures-based perceptions of route service agreement quality by installations. Breakdown during transit impacts equipment deployment time for that trip and the overall sense of system reliability. Having insufficient types and sizes of fleet components available may mean that some equipment deployment trips are not ready for operations. Consequently, performance characteristics and condition-based measures are required to quantify the impacts of different types and sizes of fleet components on each other:

TOP 10: “Past/Present/Future performance-based measurement systems”

1) To evaluate work order generation trends
2) To assess the impact of policy and other organisational changes
3) developing the installation architecture required
4)participate in the contract procurement quote determination process.    
5) Stakeholder acceptance and linkage to installation-directed contract procurement quote tech base,
6) Clarity, reliability and credibility of work order generation,
7) Variety and number of countermeasures for surge contingency scenarios,
8) Level of detail and flexibility for determination of condition-based route service indices,
9) Realistic and timely route service agreement goals and targets,
10) Integration into dispatch signal decision-making. 


 Objective evaluations of installation performance and status are made more easily available to provide internal assessments of how installations meet increased demand for equipment deployment to meet the requirements of surge contingency scenarios. Improved real-time performance data for all traditional modes of route service agreement transit can allow for more refined and ongoing evaluation of route performance and other metrics and measures that were historically often extracted only by a substantial expenditure of resources and effort.

The benefits of adding an additional measure should clearly outweigh the effort to measure it, and DOD should consider establishing performance and condition- based indices that combine several metrics and measures into a single global index which should be used to reduce the number of route service agreement metrics and measures reported even while indices that combine several metrics and measures could mask important trends in assessing the importance of individual route service agreement components with substantial impact on the results of a metric or measure. 

Fleet route service is an option for mobile operations only when different types and sizes of fleet components are mobile and available at the installations at times equipment parts are spatially deployed, and dispatchers who know how to use the service route agreement system are trained with the capacity for template test script generation.


If any one of these factors is not satisfied, an acceptable route service agreement will not be an option for that equipment deployment trip—either a different spatial mode will be used, the route service agreement will be tasked at a less convenient time, or the trip will not be made at all. These factors can be summarised:

TOP 10:  “Aggregate route service frequency line Results convert to fiscal value”

1) Measures of security--What are the perceptions involved in installation contacts, as well as the realities, of the security risks during transit?
2) Route service maintenance of different types and sizes of fleet components.
3) Define goals and objectives;
4) Generate support from command and political stakeholders;
5) Identify internal dispatch programme constraints;
6) Select performance measures and develop consensus;
7) Test and implement the programme;
8) Monitor and report performance;
9) Integrate results into DoD decision-making
10 )Review and update the programme. 

The steps indicated illustrate the process of setting up a route condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programme. None of the steps in this process should be viewed in isolation from the others, because there is considerable overlap between them. In fact, the outcomes from virtually all of these steps will influence the others and will play a significant role in determining the overall success levels of the programmes.

DoD should integrate these steps with each other and develop simple feedback loops designed to improve the effectiveness of the condition and performance-based route service agreements metrics and measurement programmes. For instance, if dispatch systems encounter problems in a particular phase of the contract procurement quotes between installations over the network interface, the resulting pilot supply line connection collection effort should establish a feedback loop that directs DoD back to selecting condition and performance-based metrics and measures that can be supported by work order generation system collection capabilities.

Dispatch systems should develop aggregate route condition and performance-based indicators to reduce the amount of information that must be processed to understand the key trends in the overall performance of different types and sizes of fleet components providing for spatial equipment deployment modes. For instance, a single indicator could be developed to represent the effectiveness of an efficient route service reservation system. Establishing aggregate indicators of route performance would be a function of several more detailed indicators, and it is expected that the aggregate indicators would provide better sourcing information to dispatchers.

Creation of new techniques assess performance dimensions of different types & sizes of fleet components which can be defined, metrics measured, and interpreted based on the goals and objectives of busy dispatchers utilising work orders more & more. Performance measurement information provide dispatchers charged with developing objective assessments of current operating constraints techniques detailing past trends and existing concerns for administration of contract procurement quote  systems, and the unmet requirements of installations for efficient, spatial equipment deployment. 

Dispatchers are advised to incorporate a review process into the preparation of system short/long range planning studies to be completed on a timely basis. This tactic will provide dispatchers with schedule requirements:

TOP 10: “Contract procurement quote schedule evaluate/revise”

1) Establish a schedule for regular performance reporting,
2) Consider system requirements determine how performance is monitored and reported,
3) Monitor system performance at agreed upon intervals,
4) Develop a results-based performance measure report format,
5) Develop a preferred approach for result integration,
6) Consider the desired frequency of system evaluation,
7) Compare the performance results to the goals set for each measure,
8) For measures not meeting their goals, identify action items for improving performance
9) For measures consistently exceeding their goals, consider increasing work order targets,
10) provided the work order decision is fiscally sound.

Dispatchers must have policies and procedures in place for work order generation toestablishes how adjustments to the contract procurement quote  approach, based on the information collected through the condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programmes employed by installations. In fact, this is quite possibly the most important step in the whole dispatch work order generation process. After collecting, evaluating, and reporting supply line information from the contract procurement quote system, dispatchers are faced with the question of what they should do to improve overall route condition and performance.

The condition and performance-based metrics and measurement standards are the factors that form the basis for evaluating goal achievement. Goals not being met should be targeted to see if further action is needed, and goals that are consistently exceeded should be re-evaluated to see if they can be set higher. This evaluation should consider whether the benefits of the higher performance level would outweigh any deficits in fiscal factors associated with achieving that performance. Without a plan, DoD is sure to struggle with integrating the results from the condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programmes with the decision-making process employed by dispatchers.

While corrective action will vary from case to case, dispatch work order generation with clearly defined target values integrated into the condition and performance-based metrics and measurement programmes are at a definite advantage over those without this additional layer of assessment:

TOP 10: “Condition/perform metrics applicable to type route services”

 1) Mechanisms must be in place for advance equipment deployment trips
2) Schedules for contract procurement quotes can change quickly,
3) Dispatching demand-responsive services is more labor-intensive for work order generation than for fixed-route services.
4) Contact with installations and confirmation of equipment pick-ups requires a lower ratio of dispatchers to different types and sizes of fleet components than fixed-route service,
5) Demand-responsive surge contingency scenarios via installation to installation route service agreements are usually less productive and requires more intensive fiscal constraints than fixed-route service
6) and the varied functions of this route service provides the potential and requirements to assess DoD performance within the scope of those functions,
7) Categories of performance measures, including their uses, typical supply line connection requirements & typical reporting intervals,
8) Different types and sizes of fleet components require unique condition and performance-based metrics and measures & range of use guidelines
9) Potential sources of supply line information for evaluating requirements for use of particular metrics and measures
10) Guidance on application of  performance-based work order standards. 

Creation of new techniques assess performance dimensions of different types & sizes of fleet components which can be defined, metrics measured, and interpreted based on the goals and objectives of busy dispatchers utilise  work orders  Performance measurement information provide dispatchers charged with developing objective assessments of current operating constraints techniques detailing past trends and existing concerns for user-based issues of contract procurement quote systems, and the unmet requirements of installations for efficient, spatial inventory deployment. 

In order for the integration effort to put maximum effort into implementing and monitoring a condition and performance-based route service agreement measurement programme to be worthwhile and effective in meeting the requirements of surge contingency scenarios, DoD must carefully consider what the performance results are indicating, and use the results both to evaluate the success of past efforts and to help develop new ideas for improving future performance.

Specific remedial actions may not be mandated  rule as a result of a particular performance metric or measure result; rather, these tools should be used to flag segments that either over-achieve or under-achieve, with specific and concrete actions determined by dispatchers on a case-by-case basis, depending on the individual circumstances. Prior to the use of contract procurement quote scheduling techniques and other automated information technologies, determining individual installation performance required considerable manual record-keeping and record compilation to derive actual condition and performance-based route service agreement supply line materiel.

Route service agreement reservations can serve as crucial sources of information on spatial equipment deployment traffic volumes, traffic signal timing information based on contract procurement quotes & number of installations requesting  work orders for active dispatchers in meeting goals for route service agreement planning processes:

TOP 10: “Equipment deployment routine volume modes Implement condition metrics trade-offs”

1) The number of measures to be reported—too many will overwhelm dispatchers, while too few may not present a complete picture,
2) The amount of detail to be provided—general metrics and measures will be easier for dispatchers to calculate and present, but more detailed metrics and measures will incorporate a greater number of factors influencing operational outcomes,
3) The kinds of comparisons that are desired to be made— will condition and performance-based metrics and measures be evaluated only internally or compared with other installations?
4) The intended audience— some dispatchers will be more familiar with route service agreement transit factors and concepts than others, and several different types of metrics and measures exist that can help DoD address these trade-offs.
5) Spatial inventory deployment planning models are used to forecast  growth of installation investments in contract procurement quote interface
6) New or expanded centralised dispatch facilities will affect work order generation patterns and the demands on operational outcomes
7) Outputs from mode-based characteristics can be used to calculate metrics and measures for Fleet type and size mobility,
8) Equipment deployment trip generation capacity, as a result of surge-based contingency scenarios.
9) accessibility of the contract procurement quote system to multiple installations,
10) Temporal modes of route service agreement reservation periods.

Equipment deployment service route time metrics and measures assess how long it takes to make a trip subject to route service agreements, either by itself or in relation to another mode involving different types and sizes of fleet components. These metrics and measures can also be used to assess how quickly the contract procurement quotes can be generated between two installations, how many work order transfers are required, and how variable equipment deployment times are from period to period. Temporal measures are useful for evaluating the route service quality of particular trips, while speed-related measures are useful for evaluating the service quality among particular installations.

Both types of measures are useful for demonstrating the effects of traffic congestion on scheduled run times for work orders when additional types and sizes of fleet components are required to maintain route service agreements and the resulting effects on bottom line of DoD. These metrics and measures are also useful for identifying the need for more direct or faster route service between two installations.   

When developing route service performance measures for installations connecting in the contract procurement quote system, it should be clear what goals the measures and metrics will serve to achieve. If a performance measure cannot effectively be tied to a goal, then it is necessary to either reassess the value of that performance measure or to reassess DoD goals to meet requirements for tasking equipment deployment goals in meeting the requirements of surge contingencies involving the fleet. For example, the constraints of achieving metric fiscal factor per mode of equipment deployment presents  demonstration of how a measure or metric debate be effective in achieving the goal of generating efficient work orders for dispatchers.

In conclusion, equipment deployment ratios based on spatial considerations constitute traditionally assumed measures to indicate an effective system. However, systems that move different equipment volumes via different types and sizes of fleet components to exhibit unique spatial ratios counter to what is assumed to be a more fiscally responsive system. If the goals of a work order generation system were to move as much equipment as possible, it may not be absolutely clear which system is best suited to achieving the stated goal, demonstrating that established measures and metrics alone may not communicate the requirements of being “effective” or “efficient,” conflict with types and sizes of fleet components in meeting dispatch work order objectives.  


 


Comments

08/17/2016 2:02pm

This is just an amazing blog. The description of the issues faced in the supply route while checking equipment performance and their possible solutions are just amazing to watch. It really helped as a number of people go through their problems and the project remains halted for some time. Amazing.

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05/30/2017 11:25pm

great

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